2019 Elections Provide Sneak Peek for Next Year’s Big Event

Party shifts occur in Virginia legislature and close race for governor in Kentucky.

11/6/2019 9:00 AM

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2019 Elections Provide Sneak Peek for Next Year’s Big Event

While much of the nation’s political coverage is already dominated by next year’s election, four states have been busy holding off-year elections this fall. Earlier this week, voters in three states went to the polls to elect two governors, two attorneys general and more than 390 state legislators. Louisiana will wrap up the off-year election cycle when voters head to the polls for a runoff election on Saturday, Nov. 16, to choose a governor and a few state legislature races not determined by the state’s “jungle” primary held in October.

On Tuesday, Nov. 5, Democrats successfully captured complete control of the Virginia legislature by flipping both chambers. Democrats also flipped the Kentucky governor’s mansion. Republicans successfully held the governor’s mansion in Mississippi and flipped two attorneys general offices in Kentucky and Mississippi.

Kentucky

Democrats successfully defeated sitting Republican Gov. Matt Bevin in a close race by electing Attorney General Andy Beshear. Current vote tallies show Beshear winning by nearly 5,000 votes but at press time Gov. Bevin has yet to concede and is expected to formally request a recanvass of votes.

Republicans elected Daniel Cameron, a former aide to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, to be Kentucky’s first African American attorney general and the first Republican to hold the office since the 1940s. Cameron defeated his Democrat opponent, former Attorney General Greg Stumbo, by nearly 15 points.

Mississippi

Republicans held the governor’s mansion in Mississippi by electing the current Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves to the state’s highest office. Tate defeated long time Democrat Attorney General Jim Hood.

Republicans also elected current State Treasurer Lynn Fitch to be the next attorney general. Fitch will become the state’s first ever female attorney general and the first Republican to hold the position since 1878. 

In the state legislature, 174 seats were on the ballot. There were no major shifts in the legislature and Republicans maintained control of both chambers while slightly increasing the majority in the Senate with two pickups (36R – 16D).

New Jersey

There were not any statewide elections in New Jersey but all 80 seats in the General Assembly were on the ballot. While Republicans were able to flip at least four seats, the chamber remains strongly in Democrats’ control (50D – 30R).

Virginia

Democrats were able to take complete control of the Virginia legislature by flipping both chambers that were narrowly held by the Republicans. Virginia Democrats already control the governorship, lieutenant governor and attorney general. While some close races are still being called, Democrats hold a one seat majority in the State Senate (21D – 19R) and a five-seat majority in the State Assembly (55D – 45R).


Follow ACA International on Twitter @ACAIntl and @acacollector, Facebook and request to join our LinkedIn group for news and event updates. ACA International members are welcome to submit news items for possible publication to comm@acainternational.org. Visit our publications page for news submission guidelines and subscriptions to ACA Daily, Collector magazine and Pulse.

Advertising is available for companies wishing to promote their products or services. Be sure to visit the ACA Events Calendar on the Education and Training page to view our listing of upcoming CORE Curriculum and Hot Topic seminars featuring critical educational opportunities for your company.


Subscribe to ACA Daily NEWSROOM

2019 Elections Provide Sneak Peek for Next Year’s Big Event

While much of the nation’s political coverage is already dominated by next year’s election, four states have been busy holding off-year elections this fall. Earlier this week, voters in three states went to the polls to elect two governors, two attorneys general and more than 390 state legislators. Louisiana will wrap up the off-year election cycle when voters head to the polls for a runoff election on Saturday, Nov. 16, to choose a governor and a few state legislature races not determined by the state’s “jungle” primary held in October.

On Tuesday, Nov. 5, Democrats successfully captured complete control of the Virginia legislature by flipping both chambers. Democrats also flipped the Kentucky governor’s mansion. Republicans successfully held the governor’s mansion in Mississippi and flipped two attorneys general offices in Kentucky and Mississippi.

Kentucky

Democrats successfully defeated sitting Republican Gov. Matt Bevin in a close race by electing Attorney General Andy Beshear. Current vote tallies show Beshear winning by nearly 5,000 votes but at press time Gov. Bevin has yet to concede and is expected to formally request a recanvass of votes.

Republicans elected Daniel Cameron, a former aide to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, to be Kentucky’s first African American attorney general and the first Republican to hold the office since the 1940s. Cameron defeated his Democrat opponent, former Attorney General Greg Stumbo, by nearly 15 points.

Mississippi

Republicans held the governor’s mansion in Mississippi by electing the current Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves to the state’s highest office. Tate defeated long time Democrat Attorney General Jim Hood.

Republicans also elected current State Treasurer Lynn Fitch to be the next attorney general. Fitch will become the state’s first ever female attorney general and the first Republican to hold the position since 1878. 

In the state legislature, 174 seats were on the ballot. There were no major shifts in the legislature and Republicans maintained control of both chambers while slightly increasing the majority in the Senate with two pickups (36R – 16D).

New Jersey

There were not any statewide elections in New Jersey but all 80 seats in the General Assembly were on the ballot. While Republicans were able to flip at least four seats, the chamber remains strongly in Democrats’ control (50D – 30R).

Virginia

Democrats were able to take complete control of the Virginia legislature by flipping both chambers that were narrowly held by the Republicans. Virginia Democrats already control the governorship, lieutenant governor and attorney general. While some close races are still being called, Democrats hold a one seat majority in the State Senate (21D – 19R) and a five-seat majority in the State Assembly (55D – 45R).


Follow ACA International on Twitter @ACAIntl and @acacollector, Facebook and request to join our LinkedIn group for news and event updates. ACA International members are welcome to submit news items for possible publication to comm@acainternational.org. Visit our publications page for news submission guidelines and subscriptions to ACA Daily, Collector magazine and Pulse.

Advertising is available for companies wishing to promote their products or services. Be sure to visit the ACA Events Calendar on the Education and Training page to view our listing of upcoming CORE Curriculum and Hot Topic seminars featuring critical educational opportunities for your company.


Subscribe to ACA Daily NEWSROOM

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